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New York: Just shut up!!!


New York: Just shut up!!!

Life as a deaf or hard of hearing person in a hearing world takes extra effort every day. The other possibility is that you have pulsatile tinnitus where your tinnitus is in time with your heartbeat. This condition affects millions of people all across the nation, so if you have been diagnosed with tinnitus, know that you are not alone. We are committed to working with our clients and their loved ones to determine the best possible road to emotional and psychological well-being. An interdisciplinary team of audiologists, speech-language pathologists, education specialists, and a child psychologist dedicated to your child’s developmental needs – every step of the way; Long-acknowledged expertise and leadership in all the disciplines we practice; A family-centered approach that engages the whole family’s participation in the habilitative process, allowing your child to thrive on every level; CHC’s signature combination of individual and group therapy (so essential for social development) from infancy through childhood; The Kellogg Family Resource Center and parent programs that nurture a community of mutually supportive families; The extra time and care every family receives from clinical staff, which children truly need to have the same potential as their peers. Speechreading therapy at CHC’s New York office is conducted one-on-one for six to 10 sessions by Linda Kessler, a highly regarded speech pathologist with expertise working with adults who are deaf and hard of hearing. I’ve grappled with tinnitus for more than a decade and have an innate talent for finding the loudest neighbors, but truthfully, I’ve always hated noise.

New York: Just shut up!!!
Lafargue, will lead a clinical staff of 12 audiologists and speech-language pathologists widely regarded as the best in their field for their use of cutting edge diagnostic tools and innovative therapeutic techniques in their work with people of all ages with hearing loss and listening and auditory challenges. Anyone who cares about a young deaf or hard of hearing person would value giving her an expanded, positive vision of future possibilities and enriched sense of self. New York is loud—get over it!” (“I can’t hear you!” is my usual response, because I am hilarious.) But I’m not alone: Noise issues are perpetually the city’s No. 1 quality-of-life complaint, beating out other pervasive problems like rodents and graffiti. It was a relief to know that that the aural fullness, brain fog, sweating, anxiety and depression were all part of the disease, along with the tinnitus and hearing loss. But in recent years, the antinoise rebellion has made progress. The city implemented a new noise code in 2007, which laid out helpful rules—there is now a set time when construction can start (the very generous 7am) and apartment “quiet hours” (no knock-down, drag-out fights after 10pm, please)—with the goal of making New York a more pleasant place to live.

Some restaurateurs have responded to objections about volume by soundproofing their dining rooms, while the MTA has installed “noise dampers” on some lines (like the N and Q in Queens) to minimize that horrid squeal. It’s one small step for man, one giant leap for man’s dwindling sanity. Still, New York is never going to be a quiet place, so what’s an oversensitive person (ahem) to do? It helps if you know where to go—I like the Prospect Park forest, which is blissfully free of anything but nature sounds—but living in NYC is a balancing act. For every thing you love, there are probably two others that piss you off on a regular basis. (We wouldn’t be New Yorkers if we weren’t always a little angry.) Noise will continue to be the thing that drives me bananas, but it can’t compete with the stuff I adore—some of which is inherently noisy (hello, Webster Hall!). So until everyone decides to put a sock in it, I’ll deal.

Pulsatile Tinnitus- Pulsatile tinnitus is characterized by pulsating sounds such as ringing, buzzing, or whistling, often marked in time with the heartbeat of the individual.