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Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus) – Women’s Alliance of Jackson, Inc. – Jackson, MI –


Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus) - Women's Alliance of Jackson, Inc. - Jackson, MI -

Try home treatment to relieve the symptoms. Call your doctor if symptoms get worse or you have any concerns (for example, if symptoms are not getting better as you would expect). You may need care sooner. Your age. Babies and older adults tend to get sicker quicker. Your overall health. If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you may need to pay closer attention to certain symptoms and seek care sooner.

Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus) - Women's Alliance of Jackson, Inc. - Jackson, MI -
Medicines you take. -My doctor had tinnitus himself and was a good example of someone living with it. Recent health events, such as surgery or injury. Pulsatile (like a heartbeat) tinnitus is often caused by sounds created by muscle movements near the ear, changes in the ear canal, or blood flow (vascular) problems in the face or neck. Your health habits and lifestyle, such as eating and exercise habits, smoking, alcohol or drug use, sexual history, and travel. Nonpulsatile tinnitus is caused by problems in the nerves involved with hearing. If you cannot reach your doctor or you don’t have one, seek care in the next hour.

You do not need to call an ambulance unless: You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you. You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down. Call your doctor today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care. If you cannot reach your doctor or you don’t have one, seek care today. If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning. If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner. Tinnitus, or ringing in your ears, affects about one in five people.

If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment. If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your doctor. You may need care sooner. Vertigo is the feeling that you or your surroundings are moving when there is no actual movement. It may feel like spinning, whirling, or tilting. Vertigo may make you sick to your stomach, and you may have trouble standing, walking, or keeping your balance.