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Sceptic vs. skeptic


Sceptic vs. skeptic

Sceptic vs. skeptic
The American word meaning (1) to disrespect, abuse, or insult and (2) an act or instance of disrespect, abuse or insult was originally spelled dis when it emerged in the late 1980s. Though yea is rare today, it still appears in legislative contexts (where a yea is a vote for a measure) and in the phrase yea or nay. But, since around 1900, the adjective has gradually come to mean of no importance or merely hypothetical. There is an exception, though: In reference to some 21st-century strains of scientific skepticism, writers and publications from outside North America often use the spellings with the k. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. And the change is not new; people have been using homogenous in place of homogeneous throughout the English-speaking world for at least a century, and homogenous is now several times more common than homogeneous outside scientific writing, so trying to preserve the distinction is probably a losing battle. The development of the k spelling is a natural result of English speakers altering the French pronunciation with the first-syllable k sound.

The c is silent in many but by no means all English words containing sc, but writers outside North America never got on board with skeptic—that is, until recently, as the sk- usage appears to be growing outside the United States, perhaps with discussion of climate “skeptics” in the media. Based on this assumption a novel treatment for tonal tinnitus – tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT) (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:1207 1210, 2010; Ann N Y Acad Sci 1252:253 258, 2012; Frontiers Syst Neurosci 6:50, 2012) has been introduced and will be tested in this clinical trial on a large number of tinnitus patients.