Clicky

Swimmer’s Ear: What to Know About Swimming & Ear Issues


Swimmer’s Ear: What to Know About Swimming & Ear Issues

Hello, I’m looking to find any information on the lines of diagnosing the symptoms of having popping in one or both of my ears (sometimes my left more than my right) that tends to happen either A) when I’m eating, or B) When I start to say certain words that seem to put more pressure in my ears such as “B” words that cause a slight pop in my ear when talking. Sometimes it is the inner ear which is ‘squishy”, and that would require a decongestant. I couldn’t sleep all night from the pain, and the pain spread to my jaw, head (causing a severe headache), and eventually a good part of the right side of my face. Losing hearing in one ear is called unilateral deafness and is an even more problematic condition in children, as it can lead to learning difficulties and social problems. I’ve had this feeling for almost a week now, and the best way I can describe it is a slight deafness in my right ear, like a constant ‘unpopped’ air bubble like what you get from altitude changes. While anyone can get otitis externa from a variety of causes, it is most often seen in children and caused by water getting in the ear from activities such as swimming- hence the name. Unfortunately, once someone has had swimmer’s ear, they are likely to get it again.
Swimmer’s Ear: What to Know About Swimming & Ear Issues

The main symptom of swimmer’s ear, or otitis externa, is ear pain. This has to do with your eustacion tubes.. For children, swelling of the ear canal might make them complain of a full feeling or discomfort in the ear. The outer part of the ear may become red or swollen, and the lymph nodes around the ear could become large and possibly tender. The symptoms of hearing loss depend on its severity. It’s too much of a coincidence that after a shower where water did go into my ear for it to be something else.surely? This is caused by pus and debris or swelling of the canal which blocks the passage of sound into the ear.

Since otitis externa is an infection in a hard to reach and delicate place, it should be treated by a doctor. Place a warm washcloth or heating pad against the affected ear and use Acetaminophen or ibuprofen to ease discomfort until seeing the doctor. I just wish there was something that could be done to diagnose it and help treat it, such as possibly even having something like a common surgery where they might just open up your E-tubes to see if there’s anything out of place or blocking/sticking to the e-tubes that causes them to open at random times. Your doctor may also recommend earplugs for water activities. Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center wants to make sure you get the facts about swimmer’s ear so you and your family can have a safe and healthy summer. Deafness in one ear is generally solved with hearing aids, small devices that nestle behind or inside the ear that boost the sound input into the ear canal. Oh yeah and to answer your question: it sounds like maybe water behind the eardrum (see the doc).